Climate Change Conference Participants in Cochabamba, Bolivia, To Propose Rights for Mother Earth

Bolivian President Evo Morales spoke at the World People's Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth in Cochabamba.
Bolivian President Evo Morales spoke at the World People's Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth in Cochabamba.
Bolivian President Evo Morales spoke at the World People's Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth in Cochabamba.
Bolivian President Evo Morales spoke at the World People's Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth in Cochabamba.

Today in Latin America

Top StoryBolivian President Evo Morales inaugurated a climate change conference in Cochabamba on Tuesday.

More than 20,000 attendants from over 125 countries are participating in the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth this week. The meeting, supported by numerous grassroots organizations, is designed to act as an alternative to the United Nations’ continuing discussions on climate change.

“We are gathered here because the so-called developed countries didn’t meet their obligation of establishing substantial commitments to cutting greenhouse gas emissions in Copenhagen,” Morales said.

Among the proposals at the conference are the creation of an international climate court and a system for wealthy countries to compensate poorer ones, according to The Guardian. Latin American leaders are also expected to urge wealthy countries to accommodate an influx of “climate refugees.”

The conference organizers are expected to unveil a final version of the Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth shortly (a preliminary version is available on the conference’s Web site). In addition to bestowing rights on the Earth, the document also defines human obligations, including the responsibility to “protect, restore and preserve the integrity of ecological systems.”

President Morales said Tuesday at a press conference that by “defending Mother Earth’s rights, we are defending human rights.”

Just Published at the Latin America News Dispatch

  • With the conference under way in Cochabamba, Nikolas Kozloff, author of No Rain in the Amazon: How South America’s Climate Affects the Entire Planet, asks how climate change will affect El Niño — an irregular weather pattern that periodically wrecks havoc on the Andes.
  • In the wake of a report criticizing 287(g) and similar programs that deputize local officials to enforce federal immigration law, we wondered what supporters of these programs consider their biggest successes. So Alison Bowen asked around to find out who’s been detained and deported in these programs. She contacted Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which trains the officers, and the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) and the Center for Immigration Studies, both groups that support 287(g). Read the latest post at her blog Beyond Borders to find out what they told her.
  • Political analyst Claudia López took some time to discuss paramilitary politics in Colombia with The Latin America News Dispatch after her recent talk at New York University. Watch the newscast here.

Headlines from the Western Hemisphere

North America

Caribbean

Central America

Andes

  • Venezuelan boxer Edwin Valero, who committed suicide Monday after allegedly murdering his 24 year-old wife, was buried Wednesday morning. Hundreds of fans attended the funeral.
  • On Wednesday, Ecuadorian president Raul Correa named a new energy minister. Wilson Pastor, head of state oil company Petroamazonas, will replace Germanico Pinto, who was fired Tuesday.
  • The IMF reported that Peru will lead Latin America and the Caribbean in regional growth this year. The same report says that the region as a whole is recovering well from the global downturn. (Spanish)
  • Colombia’s state oil company, Ecopetrol, approved the development of the Quifa oil field Wednesday.

Southern Cone

Images in this post by The City Project @ Flickr and used under a Creative Commons License.

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