Latin American Nations Join Mexico In Lawsuit Against Arizona Immigration Law; U.S. Sends Troops To Border

The wall in Nogales that divides the United States from Mexico. The city of Heroica Nogales (Sonora, Mexico) can be seen across the barrier.
The wall in Nogales that divides the United States from Mexico. The city of Heroica Nogales (Sonora, Mexico) can be seen across the barrier.
The wall in Nogales that divides the United States from Mexico. The city of Heroica Nogales (Sonora, Mexico) can be seen across the barrier.
The wall in Nogales that divides the United States from Mexico. The city of Heroica Nogales (Sonora, Mexico) can be seen across the barrier.

Today in Latin America

Top StorySeven Latin American nations have joined Mexico in support of a lawsuit against the U.S. state of Arizona’s recent immigration law.

Bolivia, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Paraguay and Peru have all filed lawsuits, all of which are similar to a legal brief filed in Mexico that supports the lawsuit filed by U.S. civil rights and other advocacy groups.

Arizona’s law requires police officers to check the immigration status of people they stop, if there is reason to suspect that they are undocumented immigrants. The law also restricts the hiring or transportation of day laborers, and allows for lawsuits against government agencies not enforcing immigration laws.

On July 1, a U.S. federal judge accepted Mexico’s brief, which the country alleges hinders the government of President Felipe Calderón in combatting drug trafficking as well as tourism and trade.

In related news, 1,200 U.S. National Guard troops will be sent to the country’s border with Mexico on August 1 as a part of the Obama administration’s effort to increase security and decrease the flow of weapons and drugs into the country.

500 troops will be sent to Arizona, with the rest going to New Mexico, Texas and California.

“These troops will provide direct support to federal law enforcement officers and agents working in high-risk areas to disrupt criminal organizations seeking to move people and goods illegally across the southwest border,” said Homeland Security secretary Janet Napolitano, according to the New York Times.

Just Published at the Latin America News Dispatch

  • Alleged spy Vicky Pelaez plans to leave Russia and return to her native Peru. Read more about the Peruvian-born columnist for New York’s Spanish daily El Diario La Prensa who is caught up in the Russian spy ring at Alison Bowen’s blog Beyond Borders.

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Image: jonathan mcintosh @ Flickr.

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