Mexican Government Raises Figure For Drug War Deaths For Second Time In Four Months

Mexican President Felipe Calderón spoke on Tuesday at an event titled "Dialogue for Security: Toward a State Policy."
Mexican President Felipe Calderón spoke on Tuesday at an event titled "Dialogue for Security: Toward a State Policy."
Mexican President Felipe Calderón spoke on Tuesday at an event titled "Dialogue for Security: Toward a State Policy."
Mexican President Felipe Calderón spoke on Tuesday at an event titled "Dialogue for Security: Toward a State Policy."

Today in Latin America

Top Story — The Mexican government said Tuesday that 28,000 people have been killed since President Felipe Calderón initiated an offensive against the country’s drug cartels three years ago.

The announcement, made by Mexico’s intelligence service director Guillermo Valdés, marks the second time in four months that the government has increased its estimate of the number of violent deaths caused by the drug war. Calderón said in April that the number of deaths was 22,700, while the Mexican attorney general’s office placed the figure at nearly 25,000 last month, according to CNN.

According to Valdés, Mexican security forces have battled drug gangs almost once a day on average over the last three years.

“It’s inevitable that we must accept that violence keeps growing,” Valdés said.

Meanwhile, security issues continued to plague northern Mexico. An explosive device blew up early Tuesday morning in a market in the Mexican town of Reynosa, on the border with Texas, CNN reports. No casualties were reported.

Reynosa has seen increasingly violence this year, due to rivalry between two drug gangs.

Just Published at the Latin America News Dispatch

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Image: Gobierno Federal @ Flickr.

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